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Hives/ Urticaria

Hives or welts, also known as urticaria, are itchy, raised, reddish areas on the skin. About a quarter of the general population can have hives during their life. Hives often appear without warning and may start at any age.

Angioedema is swelling below the surface of the skin and fatty tissue. Hives are itchy and can occur anywhere on the body including the face, extremities, chest, back or face. An individual hive usually fades within a 24-hour period and the skin returns to normal without leaving any marks or bruising.

Sinusitis

If you have nasal congestion, facial pressure, cough and thick nasal discharge, you may have rhinosinusitis, commonly referred to as sinusitis.

When something blocks the mucus from draining normally, an infection can occur.
Acute sinusitis refers to sinusitis symptoms lasting less than four weeks. Most cases begin as a common cold. 

People with allergic rhinitis or asthma are more likely to suffer from chronic sinusitis. This is because the airways are more likely to become inflamed when allergic rhinitis or asthma are present. Sinusitis may also be caused by an infection, a fungus, deviated nasal septum, nasal polyps or in rare cases an immune system deficiency.

ECZEMA/ ATOPIC DERMATITIS/ CONTACT DERMATITIS

Eczema, also called atopic dermatitis, is a common allergic skin disease that usually starts in early childhood. It can be associated with infection (bacteria, fungi, yeast and viruses) of the skin. Half of patients with moderate to severe eczema also suffer from asthma, hay fever (allergic rhinitis), and food allergies.  

Many patients wih eczema also have Contact Dermatitis. Contact dermatitis happens when the skin becomes irritated or inflamed after coming in contact with a substance that triggers an allergic reaction.

Preventing future outbreaks depends on pinpointing—and then avoiding—the irritant or allergen that triggers flares. 

For allergic contact dermatitis, knowing what to avoid often requires an in-office procedure called patch testing. 

Adverse reactions to medications are common, yet everyone responds differently. One person may develop a rash or other reactions when taking a certain medication, while another person on the same drug may have no adverse reaction at all.

Certain medications are more likely to produce allergic reactions than others. The most common are Antibiotics, such as penicillin,Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications,  Chemotherapy

The chances of developing an allergy are higher when you take the medication frequently or when it is rubbed on the skin or given by injection, rather than taken by mouth.

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic disease involving the airways (tubes) that carry air in and out of the lungs. These airways are inflamed in people with asthma. The inflammation makes the airways very sensitive, and the tubes often react to allergens or irritations. There is no cure for asthma. But with the proper diagnosis, medication and an asthma management plan, symptoms can be controlled.

An allergist has advanced training and experience to determine what is causing your symptoms and develop a treatment plan to help you feel better and live better.

An allergic reaction typically triggers symptoms in the nose, lungs, throat, sinuses, ears, lining of the stomach or on the skin. For some people, allergies can also trigger symptoms of asthma. In the most serious cases, a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis (an-a-fi-LAK-sis) can occur.

A number of different allergens are responsible for allergic reactions. The most common include pollen, dust, food, insect stings, animals, mold, medications.

 

P (845) 353-9600/ (201) 666-8500

F (845) 353-9353/ (201) 666 5241

2 Crosfield Ave. #406, West Nyack NY 10994
354 Old Hook Rd #207, Westwood NJ 07675

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